Monday, May 21, 2012

Post-War Glasgow Buildings


The style and variety of Glasgow’s architecture in the decades after the Second World War is celebrated in a new book. The free book, Glasgow’s Post-war Listed Buildings, is a partnership between the city council and Historic Scotland and Glasgow.  There are 38 post-war listed buildings in Glasgow considered of national, regional or local importance.

The first lists of buildings of special architectural or historic interest in Glasgow were compiled in the late 1960s and early 1970s. In the 1980s all of its building stock was comprehensively resurveyed and at this time many of the prominent Victorian and Edwardian buildings were added to the lists, along with a handful of outstanding interwar buildings - many of which were begun before the Second World War and not completed until afterward.
Unsurprisingly, it was not possible to recognise the best post-war buildings a mere decade or so after they were first erected, therefore an understanding of them has been built up gradually. In the mid-1990s, with the benefit of growing research into this area of study, post-war buildings have been suggested to Historic Scotland as individual listing proposals, or have been listed following reviews of the work of well-known architects, such as the practice of Gillespie, Kidd and Coia, or Sir Basil Spence and more recently as part of the reviews of significant estates such as the University of Glasgow and the University of Strathclyde.
Download this free book

Thursday, May 10, 2012

Architecture, Design & Engineering Drawings

The Architecture, Design, and Engineering category covers about 40,000 drawings (described in more than 3,900 catalog records), spanning 1600 to 1989, with most dating between 1880 and 1940. The designs are primarily for sites and structures in the U.S. (especially Washington, D.C.), as well as Europe and Mexico. American architects and architectural firms created most of the images. Building types range from the United States Capitol and the Library of Congress to private residences and hamburger restaurants.
Works by distinguished figures in the history of architecture, design, and engineering in the United States are well represented including Benjamin Henry Latrobe, William Thornton, Stephen Hallet, Thomas Ustick Walter, Montgomery C. Meigs, Cass Gilbert, and Frank Lloyd Wright.
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/ade/

Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South

Noted architectural photographer Frances Benjamin Johnston (1864-1952) created a systematic record of early American buildings and gardens called the Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South (CSAS). This collection, created primarily in the 1930s, provides more than 7,100 images showing an estimated 1,700 structures and sites in rural and urban areas of Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana, and to a lesser extent Florida, Mississippi, and West Virginia.
Johnston’s interest in both vernacular and high style structures resulted in vivid portrayals of the exteriors and interiors of houses, mills, and churches as well as mansions, plantations, and outbuildings.
The survey began with a privately funded project to document the Chatham estate and nearby Fredericksburg and Old Falmouth, Virginia, in 1927-29. Johnston then dedicated herself to pursuing a larger project to help preserve historic buildings and inspire interest in American architectural history.
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/csas/